Rory McIlroy PGA Tour is available for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, bringing EA Sports back to virtual golf, but on a whole new level. Along with a variety of courses to play from around the world, the game comes with a new Career Mode as well as a Night Club Challenge, where players compete to earn the best scores possible.

We already covered some of the general tips and strategies for the game, but now it's time to literally get into the swing of things by learning the mechanics for what goes behind the club. There are three different styles available, and we'll break down how each can work for you.

First there's the general Tour style of swing. This is the place where diehard fans of previous Tiger Woods games should start because it allows them to use real analog-style controls to get the most from their swings.

This is the toughest of the three swing styles available since you have no aiming marker, and can't use secondary features when it comes to lining up your shot. You can still preview it, however, so your ball doesn't go flying into a sand trap, or worse yet, a water hazard.

As for the swing, press down on the analog stick to get the power you want from the club – the further back you go, the more you'll maximize your swing. From there, press upward on the analog stick to complete the swing, but make sure you're as straight as possible. Drifting to the left or right could result in a hook or slice, adding to your unwanted journey out of bounds.

Remember, line up your shots, get the swing right and most importantly, make sure you pay attention to which way the wind blows. In Tour setting, this is incredibly vital, as your ball can easily sail off course if you have a drift working against you. Adjust accordingly and you’ll be fine.

Worried Tour isn't right for you? Arcadeis your best bet. This is probably the easiest setting available in the game, as it not only selects the right club for the job, but also gives you a marker showing where the ball will go before you take a swing. There are times you'll still need to make adjustments, but they'll be minor compared to the Tour setting.

In addition, you'll add spin once your shot takes off, helping determine where the ball ends up. Spin can make all the difference on a shot, especially if you're trying to get as close to the green as possible on a Par 5, using the 1-Wood on the first two shots. Distance helps with these shots, so make sure you use the spin as often as you can. It'll also keep you out of bounds if you spin to the side, or better yet, try a backspin. Staying on a fairway is far more important than distance.

You'll be introduced to these mechanics once you go into prologue, so make sure you take the time to master the lessons. It'll help when you go for your next birdie.

Finally there's the classic three-press system. Fans of previous golf games will know exactly how this works. First, you set up your aim in terms of where you want the ball to go, then you initiate the three button presses with your club.

The first gets the swing going. As you go back, it'll go into a power meter, and the longer you wait to hit the button, the more power builds up. Don't let it go too long, or it'll go back down the meter and diminish the strength behind your shot.

Next up is the second button press. After you gauge how much power you want to use, it will go to a marker that sets your accuracy. It's vital you get the gauge to as close as possible with this marker. Too far to the left or right, and your shot will drift.

Finally, the third press marks accuracy. Hit the marker and you'll have a near perfect shot heading down the fairway. If you're a fan of Mario Golf games or don't feel using an analog stick to determine your golf swing, this is a great setting to use.

There are options to customize your golf swing in a number of areas, so make sure you check out the Prologue before hitting the links and see what's available. If you're looking for a good overall setting, however, Arcade is the way to go.

Enjoy your time on the links!