While we may only be a few months away from getting our hands on the PlayStation 5, there is still much more to learn about the upcoming next-gen console. Thanks to a recently released patent, however, we at least now know that the PS5 will be utilizing a liquid metal cooling method because the future is cool.

The patent in question was filed last year, but only recently made an appearance online. According to an English translated version of the document, the PS5's cooling system will feature the use of metal alloys, including silver and copper, that are capable of remaining liquid while at room temperature. Before we go any further, it is important to note that the liquid metal cooling will not be for the entire console, but will be applied specifically to the heat sink in place of thermal paste. The rest of the system will be using fans to disperse the heat. Sorry, there won't be any tubes that are pumping liquid metal throughout the console, but that would be pretty cool.

"When the heat generation amount of the semiconductor chip increases, it becomes difficult to sufficiently cool the semiconductor chip due to the thermal resistance possessed by the grease," reads the patent (via Dual Shockers). "In the semiconductor device…a metal liquefied by heat at the time of operation of a semiconductor chip is used as a heat conductive material between the semiconductor chip and the radiator in place of grease. When such a metal is used, the thermal resistance between the semiconductor chip and the radiator is lowered, and the cooling performance of the semiconductor chip can be improve."

There's no denying that one of the major factors both Sony and Microsoft had to take into consideration while designing the next generation of consoles was cooling. The PS4 often sounds like a jet engine when the fans get going, and with more power a console has, the more heat there will be. If the use of a liquid metal as thermal paste helps reduce heat, ultimately lessening the need for super fast and loud fans, this would certainly seem like a step in the right direction. Of course, this is only a patent and not confirmation that it is in the final PS5 fans will be taking home in a few months, but it is definitely some pretty neat tech.

Related: PS5 Release Still On Track Despite COVID-19

The PlayStation 5 does not have an official launch date or price as of yet, but it is expected to drop this holiday season. If it's more PS5 goodness that you are after, look no further than our official game hub!

What do you think about all of this? Do you believe the use of a liquid metal thermal paste will help with the overall heat output of the PS5, or do you think it's going to sound like a PS4? Let us know your thoughts over on our Twitter @PrimaGames!