Coromon is a monster taming game from the folks over at TRAGsoft. It’s the studio’s first game, and I had the chance to look at an E3 preview build of the game last week. Coromon is much more than a simple Pokemon clone and has its own charm, heart, and deep RPG mechanics.

Coromon Takes RPG Monster Taming To The Next Level | E3 Preview 

Not only does Coromon focus on capturing and taming the monsters of the world, but it makes its overworld feel lived in and alive. Dungeons, in particular, focus on puzzle-solving and obstacles rather than random encounters of monsters. Dodging traps, moving boulders and switches, and different puzzles for each biome keep the overworld gameplay feeling unique. A full character customization system and emphasis on exploration are also a plus.

The biggest draw to Coromon is obviously catching, evolving, and taming the Coromon of the world. TRAGSoft has put a focus on allowing your Coromon to level up how you want them to. Leveling up your Coromon will allow you to allocate stat points as you see fit. Do you want to make your monster a glass cannon and put all of its stats into attack? Go for it.

In fact, Coromon encourages it with an added system of potential. Each Coromon has multiple color variants, each with varying degrees of “Potential”. These determine how powerful a monster can become. Higher Potential levels indicate more stat points you’ll have to increase the state of that specific Coromon. 

The E3 demo took us on a journey throughout a dungeon to find a Titan, which are the boss characters of Coromon. The story has you needing to extract each of these Titan’s Essence to help rebuild the world. The boss fight was much more than a powerful Coromon. In fact, the Titans are not Coromon, can not be caught, and have their own distinct fight mechanics.

The fight I saw had three phases, each of them adding new mechanics to the fight. For instance, after getting the Titan down to a third of its health, it used a move that did damage to my entire party. So not only did the Coromon on the battlefield take damage but also the ones on the bench. Small systems like this make the Titans feel more powerful and treat them more like a JRPG boss rather than another Coromon.

Using items to heal both your health and stamina is key to surviving many encounters in the game. It’s much less a simple turn-based monster fighter and relies more on the strategy you implement. Do you take a turn off attacking to recover your SP, which is what Coromon needs to attack? Do you heal, or do you go in for the kill? Coromon is constantly forcing you to make these decisions. 

To help players understand what they are up against, Coromon gives players all of the information they need upfront. It isn’t about guessing and remembering what the strengths and weaknesses of each monster are. Simply hover over the name of the Coromon to get all of the info you need. What it’s weak too, what won’t affect it, and more. 

Coromon is a promising monster taming game and one I look forward to playing when it releases sometime this year. If you’re interested, there is a free demo on Steam right now, go check it out and try it for yourself.

For more preview and E3 coverage be sure to check out Prima Games and our official Twitter and Facebook pages.